Where Is New Jersey?



Map of United States with New Jersey in red.

Nickname
The Garden State
In French: "The Garden State".

Motto
Liberty and prosperity
"Freedom and prosperity".

New Jersey (literally "New Jersey") is a state in the northeastern United States, bordered on the west by Pennsylvania and Delaware, on the north by New York State, and on the south. is by the Atlantic Ocean. The state of New Jersey includes the western and southern suburbs of New York City. Its capital is Trenton and its most populous city is Newark.

With an area of only 22,608 km 2 and a population of 8,791,894 inhabitants, it is one of the smallest states in the country but also one of the most densely populated.

The name New Jersey comes from the Anglo-Norman island of Jersey. This name was given in honor of Sir George Carteret, a native of Jersey, which is one of two men to whom the land was given to the seventeenth century.

Before the arrival of the first Europeans in the 1630s, the territory of New Jersey was populated by Native Americans Lenapes or Delawares. The Dutch settled on the site of the current Jersey City (on the west coast of the Hudson, opposite the tip of the island of Manhattan). These settlements were an integral part of the colony of New Netherland, which also included New Amsterdam, which will become New York.

Then the area was controlled by the British from 1664. They encountered little resistance, probably because of the inability of the Dutch West India Company to provide for the defenses of the colony. King Charles II of England gave a part of the region to his brother (the future James II, who distributed the lands between the Hudson and Delaware Rivers to two friends who had remained faithful to him during the Civil War: Sir George de Carteret and Lord John Berkeley of Stratton On March 18, 1673, Berkeley sold half of New Jersey to the Quakers who made it their colony.The province of New Jersey itself was divided into two provinces: West Jersey and East Jersey, between 1674 and 1702.

New Jersey participated in the late eighteenth century to the war of independence. It was the place of passage of the troops several times.

In December 1776, the Continental Army led by George Washington crossed the Delaware River and engaged the Battle of Trenton. This episode was immortalized by the painter Emanuel Leutze. He even appears on the reverse side of the state's coins. On January 3, 1777, the Battle of Princeton was an American victory over Charles Cornwallis' troops. In the summer of 1783, the Continental Congress met at Princeton University, which became the country's capital for four months. It was here that the news of the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783 reached the political leaders.

With a surface area of 20,168 km 2 , New Jersey had a population of 8,414,350 at the 2000 census. Its capital is Trenton. The state is located in the center of the US megalopolis BosWash. New Jersey can be divided into three geographical regions. North Jersey is located largely in New York's area of influence, and some locals work in this city. The region of Central Jersey is mostly made up of suburbs. South Jersey is located in the Delaware Valley area, the urban area of Philadelphia.

According to Köppen's classification, the South, Center and North-East of the State enjoy a humid subtropical climate while the North-West has a humid continental climate, with cooler temperatures due to the 'altitude.

The annual amplitude of temperatures is important. New Jersey has a continental climate with an eastern façade. Despite the proximity of the ocean and its low latitude, the winters are cold with a minimum below 0 ° C this season.

The average annual rainfall is between 1000 mm and 1300 mm. These are distributed fairly evenly throughout the year. It falls in one year between 40 and 80 cm of snow on New Jersey, even 1 meter on the relief in the northwest.

In winter and early spring, New Jersey is exposed to severe storms called Cape Hatteras storms as they form or intensify over this cape before traveling along the eastern coast of the United States to the North. . These are capable of generating blizzards and floods. Episodes of drought or uninterrupted rain can last for several weeks. On the other hand, tropical cyclones are rare. Hurricane Floyd struck New Jersey in 1999, but had already lost much of its momentum as he landed on the state's shoreline.

Atlantic City Weather Report Month jan. Feb. march april may june june. August sep. Oct. Nov. dec. year Minimum average temperature (° C) -5.9 -4.7 -0.4 4.1 9.8 14.8 18.2 17.5 13.1 6.5 2.1 -3.2 6 Maximum temperature average (° C) 4.7 5.8 10.9 15.9 21.8 26.7 29.2 28.5 24.8 18.9 13.2 7.4 17.3 Precipitation (mm) 87, 9 77.7 91.9 90.4 84.6 67.1 97.3 105.2 74.4 71.6 90.9 84.3 1 023 of which snow (cm) 16 17.3 5.3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.3 5.8 46.7

The state of New Jersey is divided into 21 counties.

The state is an integral part of BosWash, a megalopolis spanning several states in the northeastern United States between Boston and Washington.

The Office of Management and Budget has identified seven metropolitan areas in or partly in the State of New Jersey 4.

Metropolitan areas Urban Area Population (2010) Population (2013) Variation (2010-2013) National Rank (2013) New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 6,471,215

(19,567,410)

6,573,332

(19,949,502)

1.6%

(2.0%)

(1) Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 1,316,762

(5,965,343)

1,319,123

(6,034,678)

0.2%

(1.2%)

(6) Trenton, NJ 366 513 370 414 1.1% 142 Hammonton Atlantic City, NJ 274 549 275 862 0.5% 168-Vineland Bridgeton, NJ 156 898 157 332 0.3% 256 Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ 108,692

(821,173)

107,379

(827,048)

-1.2%

(0.7%)

(68) Ocean City, NJ 97,265 95,897 -1.4% 359

In 2010, all New Jerseyers lived in an urban area.

The metropolitan area of New York-Newark-Jersey City was the most populated metropolitan area of the United States in 2013. In 2010, the metropolitan areas of New York-Newark-Jersey City and Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington respectively comprised 73 , 6% and 15.0% of the state's population.

The Office of Management and Budget has also defined two metropolitan areas combined in or partly in the state of New Jersey.

Metropolitan areas combined Urban Area Population (2010) Population (2013) Variation (2010-2013) National Rank (2013) New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT-PA 6,946,420

(23,076,664)

7,051,125

(23,484,225)

1,5%

(1.8%)

(1) Philadelphia-Reading-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD 1,845,474

(7,067,807)

1,848,214

(7,146,706)

0.1%

(1.1%)

(8)

In 2013, New York-Newark's combined metropolitan area was the most populated combined metropolitan area in the United States. In 2010, the combined metropolitan areas of New York-Newark and Philadelphia-Reading-Camden accounted for 79.0% and 21.0%, respectively, of the state's population.

Municipalities with more than 50,000 inhabitants Rank Municipality Type County Population (2010) Population (2013) Variation (2010-2013) 1 Newark City Essex 277 140 278 427 0.5% 2 Jersey City City Hudson 247 597 257 342 3.9% 3 Paterson City Passaic 146 199 145 948 -0.2% 4 Elizabeth City Union 124 969 127 558 2.1% 5 Edison Township Middlesex 99,967 101,450 1.5% 6 Woodbridge Township Middlesex 99,585 100,574 1.0% 7 Lakewood Township Ocean 92,843 93,592 0.8% 8 Toms River Township Ocean 91,239 91,583 0.4% 9 Hamilton Township Mercer 88,464 88,919 0.5% 10 Clifton City Passaic 84,136 85,390 1.5% 11 Trenton City Mercer 84,913 84,349 -0.7% 12 Camden City Camden 77,344 76,903 -0.6% 13 Brick Township Ocean 75,072 75,832 1.0% 14 Cherry Hill Township Camden 71,045 71,722 1.0% 15 Passaic City Passaic 69,781 70,868 1.6% 16 Union City City Hudson 66,455 68,247 2.7% 17 Old Bridge Township Middlesex 65 375 66 570 1.8% 18 Middletown Township Monmouth 66 522 66 290 -0.4% 19 Franklin Township Somerset 62 300 65 280 4.8% 20 Bayonne City Hudson 63 024 65 028 3.2% 21 East Orange City Essex 64 270 64 544 0.4% 22 Gloucester Township Camden 64 634 64 297 -0.5% 23 North Bergen Township Hudson 60 773 62 341 2.6% 24 Vineland City Cumberland 60 724 61 050 0.5% 25 Piscataway Township Middlesex 56 044 58 405 4.2% 26 Union Township Union 56 642 57 542 1.6% 27 Jackson Township Ocean 54 856 56 079 2.2% 28 New Brunswick City Middlesex 55 181 55 831 1.2% 29 Wayne Township Passaic 54 717 55 040 0.6% 30 Irvington Township Essex 53,926 54,222 0.5% 31 Parsippany-Troy Hills Township Morris 53,238 53,868 1.2% 32 Hoboken City Hudson 50,005 52,575 5.1% 33 West New York Town Hudson 49,708 52,122 4.9% 34 Perth Amboy City Middlesex 50,814 51,982 2.3% 35 Howell Township Monmouth 51,075 51,732 1.3% 36 Plainfield City Union 49,808 50,588 1.6%

New Jersey has two State Designated Tribal Statistical Areas for two unrecognized tribes of the United States Federal Government.

State Designated Tribal Statistical Areas Tribe (s) Population
(2011-2015) [6] Area Nanticoke Lenni Lenape Lenapes and Nanticokes 5,946 49.62 km 2 Ramapough Ramapo Indians 1,048 18.53 km 2 Census History Year Population Variation 1790 184 139 - 1800 211 149 14.7% 1810 245 562 16.3% 1820 277 575 13.0% 1830 320 823 15.6% 1840 373 306 16.4% 1850 489 555 31 , 1% 1860 672 035 37.3% 1870 906 096 34.8% 1880 1 131 116 24.8% 1890 1 444 933 27.7% 1900 1 883 669 30.4% 1910 2 537 167 34.7% 1920 3 155 900 24.4% 1930 4 041 334 28.1% 1940 4 160 165 2,9% 1950 4 835 329 16.2% 1960 6 066 782 25.5% 1970 7 168 164 18.2% 1980 7 364 823 2.7% 1990 7 730 188 5.0% 2000 8 414 350 8.9% 2010 8 791 894 4.5%

The United States Census Bureau estimates the population of New Jersey at 8,899,339 as of July 1, 2013, an increase of 1.2% since the 2010 United States Census, which put the population at 8,791,894. inhabitants 7 . Since 2010, the state has had the 36 th largest population growth in the United States.

With 8,791,894 inhabitants in 2010, New Jersey was the 11th most populous state of the United States. Its population accounted for 2.85% of the country's population. The population center of the state was located in Middlesex County in the city of New Brunswick 8.

With 461.55 inhabitants / km 2 in 2010, New Jersey was the densest state in the United States.

The urban rate was 94.7% and that of rural 5.3% 9 . The state had the 2nd highest urban rate in the country behind California (95.0%).

In 2010, the birth rate was 12.2 ‰ 10 (11.8 ‰ in 2012 11 ) and the death rate was 7.9 ‰ 12 (8.0 ‰ in 2012 13 ). The fertility rate was 1.90 children per woman 10 (1.85 in 2012 11 ). The infant mortality rate was 4.8 ‰ 12 (4.4 ‰ in 2012 13 ). The population was 23.49% under 18, 8.73% between 18 and 24, 26.71% between 25 and 44, 27.59% between 45 and 64 years and 13.49% of people 65 years old and over. The median age was 39 years old 14 .

Between 2010 and 2013, the increase in the population (+ 107,430) was the result of a positive natural balance (+114,688) with a surplus of births (343,341) over deaths (228,653) on the other hand, a net migration deficit (-2,776) with a surplus of international migratory flows (+ 145,374) and a deficit in internal migratory flows (- 148,150) 15 .

According to 2013 estimates, 75.9% of New Jerseyers were born in a federated state, of which 52.6% in the State of New Jersey and 23.3% in another state (16.9% in the North). -East, 3.7% in the South, 1.6% in the Midwest, 1.1% in the West), 2.5% were born in unincorporated territory or abroad with at least one parent American and 21.6% were born abroad to foreign parents (45.3% in Latin America, 32.2% in Asia, 16.3% in Europe, 5.2% in Africa, 0.8% in North America, 0.2% in Oceania). Of these, 53.0% were naturalized Americans and 47.0% were foreigners 16 , 17 .

According to 2012 estimates by the Pew Hispanic Center, the state had 525,000 illegal immigrants, or 5.8% of the population. This represented the 4th largest proportion of the country after Nevada (7.6%), California (6.3%) and Texas (6.3%) 18.

According to the 2010 United States Census, the population was 68.58% White, 13.70% Black, 8.25% Asian (3.32% Indian, 1.53% Indian). Chinese, 1.26% Filipinos, 1.07% Koreans), 2.73% Métis, 0.33% Native Americans, 0.03% Pacific Islanders, and 6.37% of those entering none of these categories.

The Métis were split between those claiming two races (2.55%), mainly white and other (0.68%), white and black (0.56%) and white and Asian (0.46%), and those claiming three or more races (0.19%).

Non-Hispanics represented 82.31% of the population with 59.31% of Whites, 12.80% of Blacks, 8.19% of Asians, 1.53% of Métis, 0.14% of Amerindians, 0.02% of Pacific Islanders and 0.31% of people in none of these categories, while Hispanics accounted for 17.69% of the population, mainly Puerto Rican (4.94%) , Mexico (2.48%), Dominican Republic (2.25%), Colombia (1.16%), Ecuador (1.14%), Cuba (0.95%) , Peru (0.86%), El Salvador (0.64%) and Guatemala (0.56%) 14 .

In 2010, the State of New Jersey had the 3rd highest proportion of Asians after Hawaii (38.60%) and California (13.05%) and the 8th highest proportion of Hispanics States United. Conversely, the state had the 10th lowest proportion of Pacific Islanders in the United States.

The state also had the 4th highest number of Asians (725,726) after California (4,861,007), the State of New York (1,420,244) and Texas (964,596), the 7th most many Hispanics (1,555,144) and the 10th largest number of whites (6,029,248) of the United States.

[19] , [14]

Recent history of ethno-racial composition in New Jersey (%) 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 White 94.49 93.30 91.30 88.58 83.20 79.31 72.55 68.58 79.10 73.98 — Not Hispanic 66.04 59.31 Blacks 5.46 6.59 8.49 10.75 12.56 13.41 13.57 13.70 — Non-Hispanic 12.74 13.03 12.80 Asians (and Oceanians until 1990) 0, 05 0.09 0.14 0.33 1.41 3.53 5.71 8.25 — Non-Hispanic 5.67 8.19 Other 0.01 0.02 0.07 0.34 2.83 3 , 75 8.17 9.47 — Non-Hispanic 1.98 2.01 Hispanics (all races combined) 6.68 9.57 13.28 17.69

In 2013, the US Census Bureau estimates non-Hispanics' share at 81.1%, of which 57.3% White, 12.8% Black, 9.0% Asian and 1.5% of Mixed, and that Hispanics 18.9% 20.

In 2000, New Jerseyers identified themselves as being of Italian origin (17.9%), Irish (15.9%), German (12.6%), Polish (6.9%), English ( 6.2%), Puerto Rican (4.4%) and American (3.1%) 21 .

The state had the 3rd highest proportion of people of Italian origin, the 5th highest proportions of people of Polish and Armenian origin (0.2%), the 7th highest proportion of people of Portuguese origin and the 8th highest proportion of people of Irish origin.

The state is home to the 4th Jewish community in the United States after New York, California and Florida. According to the North American Jewish Data Bank, the state had 508,950 Jews in 2013 (412,465 in 1971), or 5.7% of the state's population and 7.6% of the American Jewish population. They were mainly concentrated in cities from New York-Newark-Jersey City (431,000) Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington (49 700), Atlantic City-Hammonton (11 700) and Trenton (9000) 22. They made up a significant portion of the population in Greater New York counties such as Ocean (10.7%), Bergen (10.2%), Monmouth (10.2%), Middlesex (6.4%) counties. ), Essex (6.2%), Morris (6.0%), Somerset (5.9%), Union (4.8%), Passaic (4.0%) and Sussex (2.9%), in the Delaware Valley counties such as Camden County (6.2%) and Burlington County (2.9%), in the southern state of Atlantic County (4.3%), and only in the center of the state in Mercer County (2.5%).

Hispanics were mainly from Puerto Rico (27.9%), Mexico (14.0%), the Dominican Republic (12.7%), Colombia (6.5%), Ecuador ( 6.5%), Cuba (5.4%), Peru (4.9%), El Salvador (3.6%) and Guatemala (3.1%) 23 . Composed of 52.4% White, 6.8% Métis, 5.1% Black, 1.1% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islanders and 34.2% % of people in none of these categories, the Hispanic population accounted for 57.9% of Native Americans, 43.9% of Métis, 35.5% of Pacific Islanders, 13.5% of Whites, 6.6% of Blacks 0.8% of Asians and 95.1% of those falling outside these categories.

The state had the highest proportions of people from Peru (0.86%) and Costa Rica (0.23%), the 2nd highest proportions of people from Colombia (1.16%) of Ecuador (1.14%) and Cuba (0.95%), the 3rd highest proportions of people from Puerto Rico (4.94%), the Dominican Republic (2.25%), the Honduras (0.42%) and Argentina (0.16%), the 5th highest proportion of people from Guatemala (0.56%) and the 8th highest proportion of people from El Salvador (0 , 64%).

The state also had the 2nd highest number of people from the Dominican Republic (197,922) and Ecuador (100 480), the 3rd largest numbers of people from Puerto Rico (434 092), of Cuba (83 362), Colombia (101,593), Peru (75 869) and Costa Rica (19 933), the 4 th largest number of people from Argentina (14,272), the 5th most large numbers of people from Guatemala (48 869), Honduras (36,556), Nicaragua (8222) and Venezuela (6950), the 6 th largest number of people from Salvador (56 532) and the 7th largest numbers of people from Spain (21,791) and Bolivia (3361).

The state had the highest proportion of Indians (3.32%), the 3rd highest proportion of Koreans (1.07%) and Pakistan (0.30%), the 5th largest proportion of Chinese (1.53%), the 6 th highest proportion of Filipinos (1.26%) and the 10 th highest proportion of Japanese (0.15%).

The state also counted the 3rd largest numbers of Indian (292 256), and Korean (93,679), the 4 th largest numbers of Chinese (134 442) and Philippine (110 650), the 5th most large numbers of Pakistani (26 006) and Bangladeshi (7567) and the 8th greater number of Japanese (13 146).

The Métis were divided into those claiming two races (93.1%), mainly white and other (25.0%), white and black (20.6%), white and Asian (16.9%), black and other (6.6%), white and Amerindian (6.2%), Asian and other (5.2%) and Black and Native American (3.9%), and those claiming three or more races (6.9%) 25 .

Traditional Protestantism 12 14.7 Unaffiliated 12 15.8 Black Church 6 6.5 Agnosticism 3 4.0 Hinduism 3 0.7 Atheism 2 3.1 Other 6 6.2

According to estimates made by Dr. John R. Weeks geography of San Diego State University, the State had the 2nd highest proportion of Muslims in the United States in 2000 (2.5%) after New York State (2.6%) 27 .

The state is home to the largest concentration of Muslims (3%) and Hindus (3%) United States 26.

According to the Gallup Organization polling institute, in 2015, 35% of New Jersey residents consider themselves to be "very religious" (40% nationally), 32% as "moderately religious" (29% nationally), and 33% as "non-religious" (31% nationally) 28 .

[29] , [30]

Language spoken at home by the population over 5 years old Language 2000 2010 2016 English 74.53% 71.31% 69.24% Spanish 12.32% 14.59% 15.90% Chinese 1.17% 1.23% 1.39% Tagalog 0.85% 0.96% 0, 95% Korean 0.70% 0.89% 0.93% Portuguese 0.93% 1.06% 0.92% Gujarati 0.60% 0.83% 0.91% Hindi 0.40% 0.71% 0.86% Italian 1.48% 1.06% 0.82% Arabic 0.60% 0.62% 0.80% Polish 0.95% 0.79% 0.71% Russian 0.49% 0, 56% 0.56% Haitian 0.37% 0.51% 0.55% Other 4.61% 4.88% 5.46% Partisan Balance in New Jersey in 2018 Government of New Jersey State Legislature Federal Convention Governor Lieutenant-Governor Attorney General Auditor Treasurer General Assembly Senate House of Representatives Senate Phil Murphy (D) Sheila Oliver (D) Gurbir Grewal (D) Stephen Eells Elizabeth Maher Muoio D: 54
R: 26 D: 25
R: 15 D: 7
R: 5 D: 2

New Jersey is an industrial state on the east coast, a former republican bastion that became a democrat in the 1980s and 1990s. It is considered one of the most progressive states in the United States.

The Democratic Party bastions are Mercer County including the capital Trenton and Princeton, the urban Essex County and Hudson County including the cities of Newark and Jersey City, Camden County, the urban counties close to the cities of Philadelphia and from New York City, Union and Middlesex Counties and the City of Atlantic City.

The northwestern and southeastern suburbs of the state, such as Somerset and Hunterdon, are Republican strongholds, along the Atlantic Ocean or in Sussex, Morris and Warren highlands.

Most New Jersey counties, however, are seen as equally divided between Democrats and Republicans, so that they can lean on either side at every election. This is the case of Bergen County, very Republican in the rural and very Democratic north in the more urban and denser part of the county. Passaic County (closer to Democrats) and Cape May County (more Republican) are also politically shared counties.

Politically, New Jersey leans sharply towards the Democratic Party like most other states in the Northeast. It was, however, once a Republican stronghold that strongly supported its candidates in the disputed presidential elections of 1948, 1968 or even 1976. It was even a pivotal state in 1960 and 1992.

Starting in the 1980s, the state began to lean towards the Democrats as the Republican Party moved more to the right towards a more southern and western oriented politics. The last Republican to win the state is George HW Bush in 1988.

In the 2004 presidential election, polls give New Jersey this role of pivotal state as President George W. Bush has become popular and seems to be able to surprise. But in the evening of November 2, 2004, the Democratic candidate John Kerry obtained 52.92% of the vote against 46.24% to President George W. Bush, reelected nationally. This is the best Republican score since 1988.

The trend is still favorable to the Democrats in 2016, when Democrat Hillary Clinton gets 55% of the vote against the 41% obtained by the Republican Donald Trump 31.

During the 115th Congress Legislature (2017-2019), New Jersey is represented in the House of Representatives by six Republicans and six Democrats, and by Bob Menendez and Cory Booker, both Democrats, the Senate 32.

The last Republican state senator in the United States Congress is Clifford Case elected in 1979 (notwithstanding the eight-month term of Senator Nicholas Brady appointed by Governor Thomas Kean in 1982 following the resignation of Senator Harrison Williams).

Since January 2018, the governor of the state is the Democrat Phil Murphy.

The present constitution of New Jersey dates from 1947. It establishes a bicameral congress comprising a senate of 40 members and an assembly of 80 members. During the 2015-2017 session, the House of Representatives is controlled by 52 Democrats (against 28 Republicans) and the Senate by 24 Democrats (against 16 Republicans).

In the elections of November 2017, Democrats won the governorship and extended their majority in the Senate (25 Democrats against 15 Republicans) and the General Assembly (54 Democrats and 26 Republicans) 33 .

The 1947 Constitution Act of the Separation of Powers within the State. The New Jersey government is divided into three branches: the executive branch, the legislature and the judiciary 34 :

The New Jersey governor holds executive power to the lieutenant governor and state agencies under its authority 34. Currently the governor is Phil Murphy 35 .

The New Jersey legislature holds the legislative power. It sits in the New Jersey Capitol which is located in Trenton. Bicameral Parliament, the legislature is divided between the General Assembly (composed of 80 members) and the Senate (consisting of 40 members) 34 .

In October 2006, the New Jersey Supreme Court gave the state legislator six months to amend the marriage legislation 37 , 38 to recognize the right of gay couples to enjoy all the benefits offered to heterosexual married couples. The court then allows the legislator the freedom to choose between same-sex marriage (like Massachusetts since 2004) and a new civil union system (as in Vermont and Connecticut). In February 2007, legislators chose to align the civil union contract for homosexuals with heterosexual civil marriage without using the term gay marriage.

New Jersey has not applied the death penalty since 1963. However, the death penalty was reinstated in 1982 before state legislators voted a moratorium in 2006 and then abolished it in 2007.

New Jersey agriculture is intensive and offers peri-urban production (cranberries, market garden crops, etc.). It is the first US state for the production of chemical and pharmaceutical products 39 . Other industrial activities are petroleum refining and metallurgy. The high technology industries are based on a network of SMEs linked to universities (Princeton …). The tertiary sector has developed through recreational activities in coastal resorts. The casinos of Atlantic City attract the population of the New York agglomeration nearby.

For its part, the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce, which was founded in 1911, works to interact daily with key New Jersey lawmakers by also representing its members in the White House. In addition to lobbying, the room interlinks its members, provides educational programs and discounts available to members 40.

The actress and singer Bea Miller comes from Maplewood in New Jersey

Oscar-winning actress Meryl Streep was born in New Jersey in Summit.

Pianist Count Basie, singer and actor Frank Sinatra and pianist Bill Evans were born in New Jersey.

Italian footballer Giuseppe Rossi was born and raised in New Jersey.

Singer Dionne Warwick and her cousin Whitney Houston were born in New Jersey.

Kool and the Gang is from New Jersey, as well as the legendary Bon Jovi band, Richie Sambora, Bruce Springsteen or My Chemical Romance.

The group Thursday (Emo, post-hardcore, screamo, Post-Punk, experimental rock) formed in 1997 is also from New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Hip Hop and RNB artists Queen Latifah, Lauryn Hill, Redman, Just Blaze, the Naughty by Nature band were born in New Jersey.

New Jersey is home to the television series The Sopranos , Earl and Dr House . Actor Zach Braff directed the Garden State film, which is located in New Jersey ("Garden State" is the nickname for the state of New Jersey).

Zakk Wylde was born in Bayonne, New Jersey.

It's in Passaic, that the action of the film of Michel Gondry takes place, Be nice, rewind.

The writer Harlan Coben (do not tell anyone ) was born in New Jersey, where he located most of the action of his novels.

Filmmaker Kevin Smith was born in New Jersey, where most of his films take place ( Clerks 1 and 2, among others). Many of his comedians are too.

Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg, authors of the Harold and Kumar films were born in New Jersey. In the first movie of the series, the characters crisscross New Jersey. Kal Penn, the actor who plays Kumar (and who is also seen in Dr. House ) was born in New Jersey.

New Jersey is featured in Futurama, The Simpson, South Park series, How I Met Your Mother; in an ironic and comical way (using jokes) to belittle him. Like this quote in South Park: "Never invite a New Jersey woman into her house!" or this one in Futurama (in the episode "A big pile of rubbish"): "The bins were full, the New Jersey was full!".

New Jersey Public Radio propose quatre stations publiques couvrant le nord du New Jersey.


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Aeronautics • Architecture • Visual Arts • Astronautics • Astronomy • Automotive • Comic Strip • Railroads • Cinema • Disney • Law • Chess • Economy • Elections • Fantasy • Football • Computer • Game • Video Game • Literature • Popular Music • Classical Music • Numismatics • Amusement parks • Photography • Radio • Health & Medicine • Science • Science Fiction • Sociology • Sport • Television • Terrorism • Theater Calendars .mw-parser-output .sep-list Roman-Chinese Gregorian Hebrew Hindu Muslim Persian Republican

The year 2007 of the Gregorian calendar corresponds to the following dates:

Major personalities who died in 2007:


This is the documentation for the {{ Nobel Prize Winners 2002 Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2002}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2002}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2002}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ Nobel Prize Winners 2003 Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2003}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2003}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2003}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2004 Nobel Laureates Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2004}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2004}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2004}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2005 Nobel Laureates Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2005}} , or adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2005}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2005}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes with empty space. .


This is the documentation for the {{ Nobel Laureate 2006 Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2006}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2006}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2006}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the palettes of the preceding text by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2007 Nobel Laureates Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2007}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2007}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2007}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ Nobel Laureate 2008 Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2008}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2008}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2008}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the pallet or palettes of the preceding text by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2009 Nobel Laureate Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2009}} , or adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2009}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2009}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2010 Nobel Laureates Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2010}} , or adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2010}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2010}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2011 Nobel Laureates Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2011}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2011}} .

It is inadvisable to use the {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2011}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2012 Nobel Laureate Palette }}.

The use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2012}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2012}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2012}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the pallet or palettes of the preceding text by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ Nobel Prize Winners 2013 Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2013}} , or adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2013}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2013}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ Nobel Prize Winners 2014 Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2014}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2014}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2014}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the preceding text or palettes by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ Nobel Prize Winners 2015 Palette }}.

Use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2015}} , or adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2015}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2015}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the pallet or palettes of the preceding text by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ Nobel Prize Winners 2016 Palette }}.

The use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2016}} , or adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2016}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2016}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the palettes of the preceding text by empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2017 Nobel Laureates Palette }}.

The use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2017}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2017}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2017}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the palettes of the preceding text with empty space .


This is the documentation for the {{ 2018 Nobel Laureates Palette }}.

The use of this template is done by adding, at the end of the page, before the portals, the {{Palette|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2018}} , or by adding it to one or more existing palettes in the form {{Palette|nom-palette-1|Lauréats des prix Nobel 2018}} .

It is inadvisable to use the form {{Palette Lauréats des prix Nobel 2018}} , which does not allow, unlike the {{Palette}} template, to correctly separate the pallet or palettes of the preceding text by empty space .